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Territory

THE RIGHT OF WAY IS THE RIGHT TO THE CITY
Toronto, Canada

DREDGESCAPING TOLEDO

Toledo, USA

EN POINTE!

Kagran, Austria
w/ Lorena Del Rio Architect

CONSTELLATORY COVE

Porto Brandao, Portgual
w/ Lorena Del Rio Architect

RECON-FIGURE
Far Rockaway, USA

UNLOCKING AMERICA'S CORE
White Space, USA

IN GRID WE TRUST
Manhattan, USA

LIQUID COMMONS
Hudson Strait, Canada

ICEROADS/ TRUCKSTOPS
Contwoyto, Canada

OUTLINE OF THE CORE
Rotterdam, NL

PLINTHESIS
Toronto, Canada

THE NEW MONUMENTALITY
Passiac, New Jersey, USA

Architecture

VARNA PUBLIC LIBRARY AND ARCHIVE
Varna, Bulgaria

STEAM STRATUM
Liepaja Latvia

FIRE DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS
San Francisco, CA

CONSERVATORY HOUSE
London, UK

DRIFT HOUSE
Arctic, Canada

TORONTORIUM
Toronto, Canada

THE INFRASTRUCTURAL SPACE OF APPEARANCE
Toronto, Canada

BRUCE MAU DESIGN OFFICE
Toronto, Canada

Installations

SCAFFOLDIA
Oakland, USA

FORMWORKS
San Francisco, USA

RE-RIGGING AIR
Copenhagen, Denmark

GARDEN OF DISPLACED ROOTS
Grand Metis, Canada

ENVELOOPS
Toronto, Canada

INTERLACE
Los Angeles, USA
w/ MG&CO

Infrastructural Space of Appearance
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 2007
Awarded: MIT Thesis Prize

Human plurality, the basic condition of both action and speech has the twofold character of equality and distinction. If men were not equal, they could neither understand each other and those who came before them nor plan for the future and foresee the needs of those who will come after them. If men were not distinct, each human being distinguished from any other who is, was, or will ever be, they would need neither speech nor action to make themselves understood.
-Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition

The Infrastructural Space of Appearance is an examination of the dilemma of the common object in a liberal pluralist society. Situating the arguments in Hannah Arendt’s The Human Condition, the thesis investigates the notion of the Space of Appearance in the contemporary city as providing a common platform for exchange. This Space of Appearance is conceived of through the linking of two public and democratic infrastructures – massive transport lines and the public library. By symbiotically linking the two infrastructures, a space for action and speech emerges that creates concern for the collective object, thereby affirming the reality provided by the public realm.

Using Toronto, Ontario as a case study of multicultural pluralism, the proposal examines the location of Southern Ontario in North America as a precursor to Toronto’s multicultural success. From here, the study zooms into a specific site in the center of the Toronto entitled “CityPlace”. CityPlace is an island formed and bounded through massive infrastructural separation, while simultaneously at the convergence of the city’s flows. It is this “neither zone” of both Southern Ontario, and more locally, CityPlace that is believed to strengthen its ability to embrace pluralism. An urban design proposal for this foreign island of CityPlace investigates the common object in pluralism at the scale of the city

Lastly, this proposal investigates the common object in pluralism at the scale of architecture, namely the public library. Through situating the discourse of the library in a historic lineage, the thesis examines the current dilemmas in library design. From here, a new typology is developed which directly addresses these problems, the CityPlace island, and Arendt’s notion of plurality. As the medium of library information increasingly transforms to non-spatially bound forms, the primary role of the new typology is repositioned as its ability to provide a common meeting ground for the city. Through an investigation of pluralism, the thesis proposes an Infrastructural Space of Appearance that provides a collective platform for exchange at the scale of the city and building, in the liberal pluralist city of Toronto.