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Territory

THE RIGHT OF WAY IS THE RIGHT TO THE CITY
Toronto, Canada

DREDGESCAPING TOLEDO

Toledo, USA

EN POINTE!

Kagran, Austria
w/ Lorena Del Rio Architect

CONSTELLATORY COVE

Porto Brandao, Portgual
w/ Lorena Del Rio Architect

RECON-FIGURE
Far Rockaway, USA

UNLOCKING AMERICA'S CORE
White Space, USA

IN GRID WE TRUST
Manhattan, USA

LIQUID COMMONS
Hudson Strait, Canada

ICEROADS/ TRUCKSTOPS
Contwoyto, Canada

OUTLINE OF THE CORE
Rotterdam, NL

PLINTHESIS
Toronto, Canada

THE NEW MONUMENTALITY
Passiac, New Jersey, USA

Architecture

VARNA PUBLIC LIBRARY AND ARCHIVE
Varna, Bulgaria

STEAM STRATUM
Liepaja Latvia

FIRE DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS
San Francisco, CA

CONSERVATORY HOUSE
London, UK

DRIFT HOUSE
Arctic, Canada

TORONTORIUM
Toronto, Canada

THE INFRASTRUCTURAL SPACE OF APPEARANCE
Toronto, Canada

BRUCE MAU DESIGN OFFICE
Toronto, Canada

Installations

SCAFFOLDIA
Oakland, USA

FORMWORKS
San Francisco, USA

RE-RIGGING AIR
Copenhagen, Denmark

GARDEN OF DISPLACED ROOTS
Grand Metis, Canada

ENVELOOPS
Toronto, Canada

INTERLACE
Los Angeles, USA
w/ MG&CO

Ice Roads / Truck Stops
InfraNet Lab, 2010
Team: Mason White, Maya Przybylski, Neeraj Bhatia, Lola Sheppard, Shannon Wiley, Ghazal Jafari

The Contwoyto Winter Road, first constructed in 1982 to give access to diamond and gold mining sites north of Yellowknife, is approximately 355 miles in length, with 87 percent of its surface residing on frozen lakes. Open for only 67 days on average during the winter, the trucking corridor reverts to water for the remainder of the year. A series of intersecting meshes is employed at the transitions between land and water that address road reinforcement, energy capture, aquatic ecologies and the formation of truck stops. As trucks travel over the ice road, they form a hydrodynamic wave below the ice that eventually hits the shoreline, weakening these transitions. The mesh is installed at vulnerable shorelines just below the water’s surface, to reinforce the ice road for safety as well as extend the trucking season. A field of networked buoys linked to a secondary mesh captures the energy from the hydrodynamic wave and stores it for use in the truck stop. These same buoys are also outfitted with flooding nozzles at the water’s surface and artificial reefs along the cable and at the lakebed, invigorating the lake ecologies during warmer seasons. As the mesh reaches land, it thickens to form the primary shells of a truck stop complex (winter) and fishing camp (summer) –enabling a moment of collectivity in a vast linear network. The proposal utilizes strategic symbiosis to reconcile the confluence of industry, ecology, energy production and collectivity.