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Territory

THE RIGHT OF WAY IS THE RIGHT TO THE CITY
Toronto, Canada

DREDGESCAPING TOLEDO

Toledo, USA

EN POINTE!

Kagran, Austria
w/ Lorena Del Rio Architect

CONSTELLATORY COVE

Porto Brandao, Portgual
w/ Lorena Del Rio Architect

RECON-FIGURE
Far Rockaway, USA

UNLOCKING AMERICA'S CORE
White Space, USA

IN GRID WE TRUST
Manhattan, USA

LIQUID COMMONS
Hudson Strait, Canada

ICEROADS/ TRUCKSTOPS
Contwoyto, Canada

OUTLINE OF THE CORE
Rotterdam, NL

PLINTHESIS
Toronto, Canada

THE NEW MONUMENTALITY
Passiac, New Jersey, USA

Architecture

VARNA PUBLIC LIBRARY AND ARCHIVE
Varna, Bulgaria

STEAM STRATUM
Liepaja Latvia

FIRE DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS
San Francisco, CA

CONSERVATORY HOUSE
London, UK

DRIFT HOUSE
Arctic, Canada

TORONTORIUM
Toronto, Canada

THE INFRASTRUCTURAL SPACE OF APPEARANCE
Toronto, Canada

BRUCE MAU DESIGN OFFICE
Toronto, Canada

Installations

SCAFFOLDIA
Oakland, USA

FORMWORKS
San Francisco, USA

RE-RIGGING AIR
Copenhagen, Denmark

GARDEN OF DISPLACED ROOTS
Grand Metis, Canada

ENVELOOPS
Toronto, Canada

INTERLACE
Los Angeles, USA
w/ MG&CO

Torontorium
Design Charette for the Bathurst Silos
Toronto, 2008

Team Leaders: Jürgen Mayer H. & Neeraj Bhatia
Design Team: Allan Wilson, David Takacs, Diana Zepf & Christian Joakim

Toronto journalist, Robert Fulford once described the pre-1960s Toronto as a city who “denied that it had an identity worth exhibiting.” In the 1970s,Toronto was said to be “too British to be American, too American to be British, and too cosmopolitan to be properly Canadian.” 

Toronto, the world’s second most multicultural city, is often accused of existing without Identity. Many Torontonians would argue this notion, stating that it is in fact the extreme diversity of cultures within city that offers Toronto a unique identity.   This unique Identity is an assemblage of multiple beliefs, creating a ‘heterogeneous whole’.   The ability to embrace dialectic notions was the chief concern of the Torontorium proposal.  Local community members called for a scheme that was simultaneously Iconic while satisfying the local needs of the surrounding neighborhoods.  Further, as a public building, the programmatic proposal was determined to accommodate local, city and international goals.  Finally, it was agreed that the building must stand for Toronto’s rich history while projecting into the future.  Within these seemingly contradictory objectives, we propose a building comprised of solids and voids that link and separate divergent programmes.  First, we start with a solid ‘rock’ to delineate and enclose these extremes while allowing them to interact.  Then, we carve into this ‘rock’ to create a new public landscape; one that is able to stitch the various circulation paths (pedestrian, bike, boardwalks), community neighborhoods and parks to the West, and City to the East.  Within this ‘communi-cave’ a mixing of divergent groups and interests emerge, a true symbol of Toronto.  The communi-cave is a fissure that originates in two locations – the Portland slip to the East (Civic fracture) and the Norway Park to the West (Community fracture).  This is in fact the root of the project, stitching two scales of programmes and users and collecting and distributing them in a communal space, which allows each to function independently.  By placing them in close proximity, however, it engages these dialectic functions in a symbiotic relationship.  For instance, community members who come to the Torontorium for a workshop may find themselves engaging in a lecture in one of the civic lecture halls.  Conversely, tourists visiting galleries are able to activate local businesses.  These two scales of programme are arranged sectionally – community programmes in the lower section, a communal space in the middle (communi-cave) and civic programmes gracing the skyline.  We suggest new community programmes such as local retail, cafes, workshop spaces, swimming pools, and theatres.  These programmes are inserted below the Communi-Cave, adjacent to the neighborhood park.  Above the Communi-cave we proposal a whole new set of interactive programmes that activate the waterfront and bring business to the surrounding neighborhoods, such as large theatres, libraries, galleries, observation platforms, and restaurants.  The Toronto Museum Project begins in the public landscape of the cave and pushes upwards towards the civic volume that provides an Iconic Identity to the project and city.  This tension between unity and difference embodied in the Torontorium provides a new image for the city that embraces and offers form to Toronto’s unique Identity.